Texas Time Travel

Historic Overnights: Mason County

Credit: Wingman Photography

Into the Frontier

Credit: Wingman Photography

About this Project

Danger Abounds!

An 1850 map of Texas indicates the "Range of the Comanches" in relation to the land promised under the Fisher-Miller Grant.
Credit: University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History.

Settling in Comanche Territory

Pictured: A. W. Kothe, his wife Johanna, their four children, and Wilhelm and Joanna Kothe. Date unknown.
Credit: Texas State Historical Association. The Texas Historian, Volume 32, Number 1, September 1971, periodical, September 1971.

Meusebach’s German Settlers

Pictured: A watercolor done by Thomas Flintoff in 1852 depicts the once bustling port of Indianola, the primary landing point for German immigrants bound for West Texas.
Credit: Public Domain. MFA Houston, The Bayou Bend Collection.
Pictured: National Intelligencer (Washington D.C.) May 13, 1847. The treaty between Meusebach and the Comanche Chiefs was so momentous, that national newspapers reported the occasion.
Credit: Portal to Texas History.

A Daring Expedition into Comacheria

This map (ca. 1860) traces the route followed by the 35th Infantry Division from San Antonio to Fort Mason.
Credit: University of North Texas Libraries, Portal Texas History.

The Raids Continue

Progress in Fits and Starts

Hasse House, a farmhouse built in 1883 by German settlers, Heinrich and Fredricka Hasse.
Credit: Texas Highways Magazine (permission TBD)

Book a Topaz Hunt

Thanks to its position on the Llano Uplift, the land around Mason yields a rare blue topaz (the state gem) found only in this part of the state.

Catch a Flick at the Odeon

Mason's neon-lit Odeon Theater was built in 1928 and is the longest continually operating theater in west Texas, still showing new releases every week.

Enter the Bat Cave

Though the Eckert James River Bat Cave is one of the largest bat nurseries in the country, it was once ranch owner W. Phillip Eckert's personal cache of bat guano.