Mildred Inn & Guest House

Built in 1872.

Credit: Keith Hardisty, keithhardisty.com
Credit: Keith Hardisty, keithhardisty.com

The Gooch Homestead

Mason's First Sandstone Homes

Paint the Town Red

In contrast with the white limestone buildings you'll observe in nearby Fredericksburg, a darker, reddish sandstone was the predominant material locally available in Mason.

Finders Keepers

The fort buildings were the first structures to use the stone, but after its abandonment during the Civil War, Mason citizens dismantled the fort to re-use the stone for new buildings.

The Union of Two Grand Families

Cora Bridges White and her children (and the family dog) in front of the residence today known as Mildred Inn. The Inn's namesake, Mildred, is the girl seated with an infant in her lap.
Credit: Courtesy of Bobbie Baze, Mildred's daughter-in-law.
Pictured: J. W. White and his son, J. W. (Dub) Jr., ca. 1915.
Credit: Mason County Historical Book (1976).

The White Legacy in Mason

The Mildred Inn ca. XXXX. An item in the Mason News in 1886 remarks on the neat appearance of a white fence (pictured) recently added to the house by Morgan Hamilton, who purchased the home and 93 acres from Ben Gooch for $10,000 in 1884.
Credit: Mason County Historical Book (1976).
Pictured: Mrs. J. W. White in front of her home, now the Mildred Inn. Date unknown.
Credit: Courtesy of Bobbie Baze, daughter-in-law of Mildred White.

Nearly a Century

Pictured: Mildred White, date unknown.
Credit: Courtesy of Bobbie Baze, Mildred's daughter-in-law.

A Party at Mildred’s

To counter the rugged construction material, many builders chose to contrast the stone with white coursing between each block for added elegance.
Credit: Keith Hardisty, keitherhardisty.com